Computer Science

Frank Shipman

Title: 
Professor, Department of Computer Science
Email: 
shipman@cs.tamu.edu

Frank Shipman has been pursuing research in the areas of hypermedia, computer-supported cooperative work, multimedia, computers and education, and intelligent user interfaces since 1987. Frank's work at Baylor College of Medicine, the University of ColoradoXerox PARC, and Texas A&M University investigates the design and use of media combining informal and formal representations and methods for supporting incremental formalization.

Frank helped found the field of spatial hypertext and helped design and develop a number of collaborative hypermedia systems including the Virtual Notebook System, theHyper-Object SubstrateVIKI , the Visual Knowledge BuilderWalden's Paths, and Hyper-Hitchcock.

Frank has been PI or Co-PI on more than $5.7 million in grants including more than $3.8 million from NSF, more than $1.1 million from other competitive sources including DARPA and the intelligence community, and more than $800,000 from industry including Microsoft, Google, and Hewlett Packard. His research has resulted in more than 100 refereed publications including two best paper awards and six other papers nominated for best paper awards at ACM and IEEE conferences.

Richard Furuta

Title: 
Professor, Department of Computer Science
Email: 
furuta@cs.tamu.edu

Richard Furuta is a faculty member at Texas A&M University where he is a Professor in the Department of Computer Science, Director of the Center for the Study of Digital Libraries, and Director of the Hypermedia Research Laboratory. Dr. Furuta’s current areas of research include digital libraries, digital humanities, hypermedia systems and models, structured documents, and document engineering. He also has studied applications in computer supported cooperative work, software engineering, visual programming, document structure recognition from bitmapped sources, and management systems for three-dimensional-gesture-based user interfaces. In the area of Digital Libraries, he was one of the founders of the 1994 and 1995 Digital Libraries Conferences, which subsequently became the ACM Digital Libraries series, and later merged with the IEEE-CS series to form the ACM/IEEE-CS Joint Conference on Digital Libraries (JCDL). Many of Dr. Furuta’s current research projects are highly interdisciplinary, especially those in the area of Digital Humanities. These current projects include the Cervantes Project, centered on the iconic author of Don Quixote, the Picasso Project, which is creating a digital reasoned catalog that already contains more than 10,000 of Picasso’s art works, and the Nautical Archaeology Digital Library, in conjunction with the campus’ Institute for Nautical Archaeology.